We promote individual freedom from all forms of government, commerce, and ideologies with the invention and proliferation of technology that ensures everyone’s basic needs of survival are met; everything from food, water, shelter, communications; even lethal and non-lethal defensive weapons for personal security.

Lillith Eschaton Demiurge

Sanctient is the combination of Saint + Ancient. It is the brainchild of Lillith Eschaton Demiurge, formerly Sean Henri Edmond the III. Envisioned circa 2006, it served the purpose of alleviating the symptoms of Terror Management in all of humanity by exposing the links between science and religion; and providing scientifically verifiable evidence in an afterlife. However, with the economic and environmental challenges threatening the lives of every human on earth; a decision was made to extend its outreach to solving poverty, global warming, and the idea of over-population. Our fundamental solutions are as follows:

Principles of Neo-Sovereignty

¹ Maslow & Becker Window of Psychology

The human species can be summed up neatly between the theory’s posited by Abraham Maslow, Earnest Becker, and Lillith Demiurge. These are prospectively Maslow’s ‘Hierarchy of Needs,’ Becker’s ‘Terror Management Theory,’ and Lillith’s ‘Theory of Psychosomatic Trauma.’

There is a fundamental and interesting dichotomy between Maslow’s Heirarchy of Needs (HON) and Becker’s Terror Management Theory (TMT). It is that the higher a human is on the scale of Maslow’s HoN, the lower (¹ …or higher?) they fall on the scale of Becker’s TMT. To the right, you should see a theoretical diagram created by our founder, Lillith Demiurge. It details what she calls the Maslow-Becker Window of Psychology. It gives an almost intimate account of the most probable psychological architecture of any individual, based upon their socio-economic status. Once a human is properly placed on the scale, the only thing left is to research their life through the lens of Lillith’s Theory of Psychosomatic Trauma, and you have a near complete psychological blueprint of that individual.

Now, a properly trained practitioner can read the psychological makeup on an individual in a matter of hours and manipulate them to no end; but the truly erudite among us can read vast populations and control them with ruthless efficiency.

So, why is all this important?

Every human on earth needs food, water, oxygen, shelter, and heat to survive. When the human does not have these things, then the threat of death becomes more prominent in the mind of the individual. There is a fundamental issue here that should be highlighted; because the lower the human falls on the scale of Maslow’s Heirarchy of Needs, the higher (lower?) they fall on the scale of Becker’s scale of Terror Management.

as well as the sociologists studying this theory, have all purported that death denial and cultural affiliation is the root cause for all human conflict.

Now, with these two psychological factors in mind, let’s think of our economic system. To the left is the

Reversing Global Warming

Trees release oxygen when they use energy from sunlight to make glucose from carbon dioxide and water. Like all plants, trees also use oxygen when they split glucose back down to release energy to power their metabolisms. Averaged over a 24-hour period, they produce more oxygen than they use up; otherwise there would be no net gain in growth.

It takes six molecules of CO2 to produce one molecule of glucose by photosynthesis, and six molecules of oxygen are released as a by-product. A glucose molecule contains six carbon atoms, so that’s a net gain of one molecule of oxygen for every atom of carbon added to the tree. A mature sycamore tree might be around 12m tall and weigh two tonnes, including the roots and leaves. If it grows by five per cent each year, it will produce around 100kg of wood, of which 38kg will be carbon. Allowing for the relative molecular weights of oxygen and carbon, this equates to 100kg of oxygen per tree per year.

A single human breathes about 9.5 tonnes of air in a year, but oxygen only makes up about 23 per cent of that air, by mass, and we only extract a little over a third of the oxygen from each breath. That works out to a total of about 740kg of oxygen per year. If a single tree produces 100kg of oxygen per year, and a human uses 740kg of oxygen a year, than it would take roughly seven or eight trees’ per human to replenish the oxygen used by humans; and this isn’t even taking into account the vast differences in oxygen production by each species of tree or the phytoplankton in our ocean.

In order for Earth’s biomes to sustain life, there must be a balance between flora and fauna. If the total population of earth is approximately 8 billion, than earth would need a minimum of 64 billion trees’ alone to sustain the human population alone. This isn’t even taking into account the various levels of oxygen production per species and ages of each tree.

Trees can live without us; we can not live without trees.

Lillith Eschaton Demiurge

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) lists electric production, industry, agriculture, and transportation as the top contributors to climate change; making up 84% of all carbon dioxide emissions. The loss of these industries however would result in loss of human life numbering in the billions. Many solutions have been proposed, from the adoption of meat alternatives to cutting back on fuel emissions in vehicles; but ultimately, none of these solutions get to the root cause for climate change: deforestation.

Trees release oxygen when they use energy from sunlight to make glucose from carbon dioxide and water. Like all plants, trees also use oxygen when they split glucose back down to release energy to power their metabolisms. Averaged over a 24-hour period, they produce more oxygen than they use up; otherwise there would be no net gain in growth.

It takes six molecules of CO2 to produce one molecule of glucose by photosynthesis, and six molecules of oxygen are released as a by-product. A glucose molecule contains six carbon atoms, so that’s a net gain of one molecule of oxygen for every atom of carbon added to the tree. A mature sycamore tree might be around 12m tall and weigh two tonnes, including the roots and leaves. If it grows by five per cent each year, it will produce around 100kg of wood, of which 38kg will be carbon. Allowing for the relative molecular weights of oxygen and carbon, this equates to 100kg of oxygen per tree per year.

A single human breathes about 9.5 tonnes of air in a year, but oxygen only makes up about 23 per cent of that air, by mass, and we only extract a little over a third of the oxygen from each breath. That works out to a total of about 740kg of oxygen per year. If a single tree produces 100kg of oxygen per year, and a human uses 740kg of oxygen a year, than it would take roughly seven or eight trees’ per human to replenish the oxygen used by humans; and this isn’t even taking into account the vast differences in oxygen production by each species of tree or the phytoplankton in our ocean.

In order for Earth’s biome to sustain life, there must be a balance between flora and fauna. If the total population of earth is approximately 8 billion, than earth would need a minimum of 64 billion trees’ alone to sustain the human population alone. Ultimately, it would seem the problem is that there is too many humans on earth to sustain life.

America: Democracy or Republic

Freedom in America, as well as the legal and economic sovereignty of each of it’s states, are quintessential for the country’s economic and military superiority. When power is condensed to a few individuals, it can be likened to everyone boarding a single train: One wrong move, one bend in the tracks, and everyone riding that train suffers from it’s derailment. That train, today, is the private Federal Reserve bank and the institution of fiat currency.

“…I sincerely believe… …that banking establishments are more dangerous than standing armies; and that the principle of spending money to be paid by posterity, under the name of funding, is but swindling futurity on a large scale.” – Thomas Jefferson

Politically, the country is divided by Democrats and Republicans. Coincidentally, these political parties are in fact different representations of systems of government; sharing many similarities, with one notable exception in management of the country’s treasury. Monetarily, in a Republic, laws are put in place to prevent the public from having the ability to vote for access to the country’s treasury. These rules, ensure the country remains fiscally viable on the world stage and that inequality between business and the citizens remain at a minimum. In a Democracy however, no such rules exist. In fact, a democracy by it’s very practice cannot exist as a permanent form of government. Once voters discover that they can vote for themselves generous gifts from the public treasury, the majority will always vote for the candidates promising the most benefits from the government. The net result is complete economic degradation, the collapse of the countries military, and the rise of a dictatorship.

America is supposed to be a Republic; not a Democracy. It’s in the very Pledge of Allegiance:

“I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.”

Unfortunately, there are foreign agents within the American political system that realize this dichotomy, and have used their resources to undermine America’s freedoms. China is but one indication of this. They have invested large quantities of money into the American education system; and with these investments, they have slowly introduced communist propaganda into the teaching curriculum. The rise of “democratic socialism” is evidence of this. There are also concerns with China’s ownership of Syngenta, manufacturers of the controversial pest control product Atrazine. Numerous scientific studies have shown that Atrazine is capable of inducing feminine characteristics and behaviour in humans upon exposure. The rise in people experiencing gender dysphoria and the formation of cultural groups to reflect this shared phenomenon, for better or for worse, are proven instances of this chemical’s influence on the population.

The private sector is also playing a part in undermining America’s prosperity. The six major media conglomerates in America have used statistical anomalies in homosexuality and school shootings to promote cultures that ultimately undermine the security of the country. Homosexuality in America used to exist in very small pockets of society; but with it’s promotion by the mass media, entire cultures and institutions have formed. With the LGBT community normalizing homosexual behaviour, whether for better or for worse, this has contributed to the decline of America’s population. Gun control is also a topic of focus for the mass media. In the year 2000, there was only one active shooter incident in America. With the national news coverage of active shooters and the sensationalist propaganda of gun control in the weeks that follow, however, that statistic has risen to thirty incidents of active shooters. As a response, small cultures and political institutions have formed; dedicated to making gun control a reality and abolishing the second amendment.

Clearly, there is an agenda to influence the public politically;

In

Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs comprises of a five-tier model of human needs, often depicted as levels within a pyramid. Needs lower down the hierarchy must be satisfied before individuals can attend to needs higher up. From the bottom of the hierarchy upwards, the needs are as follows:

  • Physiological: these are biological requirements for human survival, e.g. air, food, drink, shelter, clothing, warmth, sex, sleep. 
  • Safety: protection from elements, security, order, law, stability, and freedom from fear.
  • Love and Belonging: encompassing both feeling loved and feeling love towards others, these are social interaction and romantic relationships, e.g. friendship, intimacy, trust, and acceptance; as well as being part of a group (family, friends, work).
  • Esteem: this can be classified into two categories:
    • esteem for oneself, e.g dignity, achievement, mastery, independence.
    • the desire for reputation or respect from others, e.g., status, prestige.
  • Self-actualization: realizing personal potential, self-fulfilment, seeking personal growth and peak experiences.

Becker’s Terror Management Theory

Terror Management Theory posits that while humans share with all life-forms a biological predisposition toward self-preservation in the service of reproduction, we are unique in our capacity for symbolic thought, which fosters self-awareness and the ability to reflect on the past and ponder the future. This spawns the realization that death is inevitable and can occur at any time for reasons that cannot be anticipated or controlled.

This awareness of death engenders potentially debilitating terror that is “managed” by the development and maintenance of cultural worldviews: humanly constructed beliefs about reality shared by individuals that minimize existential dread by conferring meaning and value. All cultures provide a sense that life is meaningful by offering an account of the origin of the universe, prescriptions for appropriate behaviour, and assurance of immortality for those who behave in accordance with cultural dictates. Literal immortality is afforded by souls, heavens, afterlives, and reincarnations associated with all major religions. Symbolic immortality is obtained by being part of a great nation, amassing great fortunes, noteworthy accomplishments, and having children.

Psychological equanimity also requires that individuals perceive themselves as persons of value in a world of meaning. This is accomplished through social roles with associated standards. Self-esteem is the sense of personal significance that results from meeting or exceeding such standards.

Three lines of research provide empirical support for Terror Management Theory:

  • The anxiety-buffering function of self-esteem is established by studies where momentarily elevated self-esteem results in lower self-reported anxiety and physiological arousal.
  • Making death salient by asking people to think about themselves dying (or viewing graphic depictions of death, being interviewed in front of a funeral parlor, or subliminal exposure to the word “dead” or “death”) intensifies strivings to defend their cultural worldviews by increasing positive reactions to similar others, and negative reactions toward those who are different.
  • Research verifies the existential function of cultural world-views and self-esteem by demonstrating that non-conscious death thoughts come more readily to mind when cherished cultural beliefs or self-esteem is threatened.

Terror Management Theory was developed in 1986 by social psychologists Jeff Greenberg, Tom Pyszczynski, and Sheldon Solomon based upon Ernest Becker’s ideas. Terror Management Theory has generated empirical research (currently more than 500 studies) examining a host of other forms of human social behaviour, including aggression, stereotyping, needs for structure and meaning, depression and psychopathology, political preferences, creativity, sexuality, romantic and interpersonal attachment, self-awareness, unconscious cognition, martyrdom, religion, group identification, disgust, human-nature relations, physical health, risk taking, and legal judgments.

In 2015, Greenberg, Pyszczynski and Solomon published The Worm at the Core, which reviews this vast body of research supporting Becker’s central claim that the fear of death is “the mainspring of human activity.”

Lillith’s Psychosomatic Trauma Theory

Psychosomatic Trauma Theory is defined by the degree of sensory information experienced by the sensory organs and their effect on conscious and subsequently, the subconscious. Although trauma is often classified as any experience that is thought to have a profound influence on the mental state of the individual, in reality, trauma accounts for all experiences a person goes through; from a complicated death of a loved one to the simple experience of eating. This is because as humans grow up, the mental state of the individual establishes a baseline or normality, and any experience that differs from the norm, whether it is interpreted as a good thing or a bad thing, is in essence a traumatic experience.

There are two types of sensory trauma, abrupt and prolonged. Abrupt trauma is any differing experience one feels at an instant; like witnessing the sudden death of a pet or winning the lottery. Prolonged trauma is any differing experience felt over a long period of time; like working a mindless, soul-killing job or being in a long loving relationship with someone. In both instances, the conscious is first affected, and this could result in any recognizable emotion; and then subsequently, the subconscious; and this could be interpreted as anything from an addiction or fear, or in some extreme cases, a mental illness.

All mental illness is caused by either biological or psychological factors. Biological mental illnesses are caused by the death or dysfunction of certain brain cells, and this could result in anything from Alzheimer’s to Autism. Psychological mental illnesses on the other hand are caused by a combination of terror management and an inability to conform to one’s cultural world view.

Psychosomatic Trauma Theory is is a term invented by the founder. This description is poor and needs elaboration.